REYKJANES PENINSULA TOUR

The Reykjanes Peninsula is a dramatic place filled with natural beuty, in the rugged inhospitable landscape you’ll find not only the gem which is the Blue Lagoon, one of Iceland’s most famous attraction set in the rough lava fields, but also other gorgeous and interesting sights all around, many of them close to active volcanoes.

Krýsuvík – Columns of steam rise skywards, bubbling mud pools play their rhythmical symphony, and the banks around the hot springs are coloured green, yellow and red. The Grænavatn and Gestastaðavatn lakes and the two small pools on each side of the road further south, Augun (Eyes), are all explosion craters created by volcanic eruptions at various times. Grænavatn lake is the largest, some 46 metres deep, with green water due to thermal algae and crystals which absorb the sun. The main geothermal areas in Krýsuvík are Seltún, Hverahvammur, Hverahlíð, Austurengjar, the southern part of Kleifarvatn and Sveifla beneath Hettutindur.

Fúlipollur – The Fúlipollur mud spring is east of the main road.Lake Kleifarvatn is the largest lake on the Reykjanes peninsula, and the third-largest lake of southern Iceland, 9.1 km². It is also one of the country’s deepest lakes, at 97 metres. It varies in size over the year. Since 2000 it has been shrinking, after two major earthquakes probably opened up fissures on the lake bottom. Trout fry were released into the lake in the 1960s, and the fish have thrived quite well. According to legends a monster in the shape of a serpent, as big as a medium-sized whale, lurks in the lake.

For privacy reasons YouTube needs your permission to be loaded.
I Accept

Book this tour

Loading…